Thursday, July 4, 2013

Choosing Materials to Help Students Meet Their IEP Goals

Every year, I receive a new and different caseload of students to work with. Granted, there are some students that I keep from the previous year, but I always end up with move-ins/transfers and students that have moved up a grade {I have 3rd and 4th graders, mainly}.

Before school starts, I create a caseload binder and my IEP cheat sheet ring, and I also take a particular focus on my student's individual IEP goals, as these goals are what has to guide my instruction with them.

Depending on how IEP goals are written, it can be difficult to find a resource(s) that meet the needs of the student and that meet the requirements of the goal. Because all goals are different, I cannot tell you every resource to use for each particular goal, but when I was a first year teacher, this is something I really did not place my main focus on. Now that I have experience and learned how to better prepare myself for the school year, I wanted to share some advice with you all!

When I gain access to my new students' IEPs, I create a chart that includes their goals, what I will use to work on this goal, and how this goal will be assessed/documented.


By creating this chart on each student prior to school starting, I can see where I may lack in materials or what documentation forms/assessments I may need to create. In the materials section, I usually end up listing a lot of hands-on manipulatives, specific task cards/activities, games, and even Ipad Apps that will focus directly on whatever the goal entails. If I don't have anything in my classroom that will specifically focus on the goal, I either create the material myself or go shopping on TPT! Also, using other teachers in your building can help tremendously. Since we have to focus on so many different grade levels, it can be much easier to go directly to the grade level teacher to ask for materials. I beg and borrow all the time! 

For those of you that have students with autism and need to work on social skills, click on the picture below to go to the ultimate app list for social skills and ASDs. Be sure to leave a thank you note on the webpage - this woman put soooo much work into this incredible resource!


 Have a wonderful week!

4 comments:

  1. I know I have commented a lot, but I can't express the gratitude I have for this blog! You all are awesome and I feel so much more at ease because I feel like I have a grasp on what to expect. I know it won't be perfect and I still have tons to learn, but I feel like I have a good basic foundation.

    ~Tasha
    A Tender Teacher for Special Needs

    ReplyDelete
  2. Gabrielle,

    This is an awesome idea for any teacher that is working with students with IEPs. Definitely helps you plan out your year.

    Jennifer Smith-Sloane
    4mulaFun

    ReplyDelete
  3. I might be missing something but I'm interested in seeing an example of your caseload binder. When I click to your website I don't see anything.

    ReplyDelete

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